Getting Rid of Resentment

Getting Rid of Resentment

I have a tremendous problem with resentment and letting things go. This article helped me understand that it’s important to “turn that frown upside down”. And it’s just plain healthy to replace those hateful thoughts with tender lovingkindness. ❤

How to get rid of resentment

written by: Bodhipaksa Nov 09, 2011

Ann Lamott, in her novel Crooked Little Heart, says that holding onto resentment is like eating rat poison and waiting for the rat to die.

Resentment is seductive. We assume on some level that it’s going to help us, but it doesn’t. It just causes us pain.

This is something that just about all of us need help with.

1600 years ago, a compiler and commenter of Buddhist texts called Buddhaghosa put together an extraordinary “tool kit” of ways to deal with resentment. I was recently looking at this guidance, which is part of Buddhaghosa’s encyclopedic work on meditation, The Visuddhi Magga, or Path of Purity, and thought it was so fresh, well thought-out, and relevant that it was worth restating some of what he had to say.

Twelve techniques for getting rid of resentment

1. Lovingkindness practice

This one’s pretty obvious — if you’re a meditator at least. You can simply call to mind the person you’re resentful of, and cultivate good will toward them. We have a whole section of this site devoted to teaching the metta bhavana (development of lovingkindness) practice, so I won’t say much about that here, except that it does work! When I first started practicing meditation I had a lot of problems with resentment, and I was often surprised by how quickly my anger and resentment toward someone would just vanish.

2. Reflect that resentment is never justified

Buddhaghosa suggests that we “reflect upon the saw.”

This one needs a bit of unpacking. There’s a “Simile of the Saw” in the early Buddhist scriptures, where the Buddha says that even if bandits brutally sawed a person limb from limb, “he who entertained hate in his heart would not be one that carried out my teaching.” In other words, it doesn’t matter what the provocation is, hatred is never justified. The mind can go “but … but …” as much as it likes, but hatred remains a negative emotion that destroys our happiness, causes suffering for others, and prevents us from experiencing peace.

Pretty much all of us, though, carry around the idea that there’s such a thing as “righteous resentment.” And we assume that hatred is justified. We tell ourselves stories about how bad the other person is, and this seems to make it natural for us to hate them. What we’re not doing is taking responsibility for our ill will. It’s our interpretation of other people’s actions that makes us hate them. We cause our own hate.

Don’t take the parable of the saw literally. Of course (unless you’re an advanced practitioner of superhuman stature) you’d experience hatred toward an aggressor who was torturing you. That wouldn’t mean that you weren’t a Buddhist — but it would mean that in the moment of hatred you would not “be one that carried out [the Buddha’s] teaching.” The point of the parable is simply to undermine the idea of “righteous resentment.”

Incidentally, some Tibetan monks and nuns who have been brutally tortured by Chinese security forces have avoided developing hatred toward their tormentors by means of compassion — reflecting that their torturers are building up bad karma for themselves.

3. Winning the real battle

Hot on the heels of the advice to reflect on the parable of the saw is an admonition to reflect that in developing hatred you’re actually giving a person who hates you what they want. (This is assuming that the other person hates you, which isn’t always the case.)

What does a person who hates you want for you? Bad stuff, that’s what. Buddhaghosa points out that hatred makes you ugly, causes you pain, destroys your good fortune, causes you to lose your wealth (or not to create any, perhaps because you’re distracted), detracts from your reputation, loses you friends, and leads to a bad rebirth. This is all bad stuff.

Someone who really hated you might wish all these things on you, and here you are doing them to yourself! You’re handing your hater victory. You’re doing him or her a favor. And by getting angry at an angry person, Buddhaghosa says, you become worse than them, and “do not win the battle hard to win,” which is of course the battle with yourself, to remain happy and unruffled.

So basically, we reflect here that true victory can’t come from getting angry at an angry person. That’s defeat. Victory comes from remaining calm, loving, and equanimous.

4. “Accentuate the positive”

Buddhaghosa suggests that we think about something positive in the other person, so that you can “remove irritation.”

This works, too. Resentment doesn’t like complexity. When you bear in mind someone’s good points — even things (dammit!) that we admire — it’s harder to keep the resentment going.

5. Develop compassion

But if you can’t think of anything positive about the other person, or if they truly don’t have any positive qualities (although that’s almost impossible) then you should develop compassion toward them. In Buddhaghosa’s world view, a person with no redeeming qualities is bound for the torments of the hell realms, and is therefore worthy of our compassion. I should stress that in Buddhism the hells are not permanent and are not punishments — they are simply places where we are reborn for a while as a result of our actions. Buddhist hells are a kind of “fat farm” where we burn off our bad karma.

6. Notice how you’re causing yourself suffering

As Ann Lamott points out, resentment hurts us. Buddhaghosa offers many reflections along those lines:

If another person has hurt us, why should we then hurt ourselves? In your life you’ve had to give up many things that brought you happiness, so why not walk away from resentment, which makes you miserable? If another person has done something we disapprove of, then why do something (like getting angry) that we would also disapprove of? If someone wants you to get angry, why give them the satisfaction? You may make the other person suffer with your anger. Then again you may not. But you’ll definitely hurt yourself. The thing you got angry about is impermanent and in the past. So why are you angry now?

He’s kind of unrelenting, that Buddhaghosa.

7. Reflect that all beings are the owners of their karma

This is a common reflection in Buddhism: all beings create their own actions (kamma) and inherit the consequences of those actions. The other person may have done things that are unskillful, and those actions will cause them suffering. So what’s the point of you doing exactly the same thing, by acting out of the unskillful state of resentment? It’s like picking up a hot coal to throw at the other person. You may hurt them, but you’re definitely going to hurt yourself.

The other person, if they are angry with you, is causing themselves pain. It’s like, Buddhaghosa says, them throwing a handful of dust into the wind. They may be aiming at you, but it’s their eyes that will end up smarting.

Reflecting in this way we can untangle our respective lives. The other person’s faults, real or imagined, are no longer an occasion for us to exercise our own faults.

8. Reflect on exemplars of patience

Buddhaghosa goes a bit over the top with this one, devoting almost as much time on this method of dispelling resentment as he does on all the others put together. His approach is to remind us of various past lives of the Buddha, or jataka tales, as they’re called. These are mythological stories about the Buddha’s previous lives, as he developed the qualities of compassion and wisdom that led to his awakening.

I’ve found that being in the presence of someone who is very patient causes me to let go of my resentments. I had a good friend in Scotland who I never — not once — heard say an unkind word about anyone. Sometimes I’d be bitching about someone else, and my friend would just come in with some wise and kind word about the other person’s life that would put everything in perspective and leave me feeling a bit petty about having ranted. Even now, just calling that friend to mind helps me evoke a sense of patience.

9. Reflect that all beings have been your dearest friends and relations in a previous life

I’m not big on past lives, or in belief in rebirth generally, but if you do take that kind of thing seriously, then Buddhaghosa’s advice is to remember that because of the beginninglessness of time, every being — including those you get most pissed off with — have been your mother, father, brother, sister, son, and daughter. When that person was your mother, they carried you in their womb, suckled you, wiped away your snot and shit, and generally lavished you with love. And we can reflect, Buddhaghosa says, thus: “So, it is unbecoming for me to harbor hate for him [or her] in my mind.”

Being one of a scientific bent, and not putting much stock in reflections that rely on assuming that rebirth is a reality rather than a myth, or perhaps a metaphor, I find myself approaching this advice in a different way. Let’s take rebirth as a metaphor: change is happening all the time, and so we’re each reborn in every moment. Each moment we die and are reborn.

Each momentary contact with the world is part of this process of death and rebirth. In fact, each perception is a kind of birth. It’s the birth of a new experience, and thus of a new “us.” Each contact that we have with another being is part of this process. Each time we see someone, hear someone, touch someone, even think or someone, a new experience arises and a new being is born. So in this way, all beings that we have contact with are our mothers. Each being we have contact with in this moment helps give birth to the being that exists in this moment. And since, in our immensely complex world, the unfolding, never-ending death-and-rebirth of each being is ultimately connected with the never-ending death-and-rebirth of each other being, all beings are our mothers.

10. Reflect on the benefits of lovingkindness

You can reflect on the benefits of lovingkindness, and how you’ll deny yourself those benefits by indulging in resentment. What are the benefits? Well, it’s worth reflecting on that through examining your own experience, but here’s Buddhaghosa’s list, which comes from the scriptures: You’ll sleep in comfort, wake in comfort, and dream no evil dreams. You’ll be dear to human beings and to non-human beings. Deities will guard you. Fire and poison and weapons won’t harm you (although that seems unlikely, to say the least). More plausibly, your mind will be easily concentrated. You’ll be reborn in a pleasant realm (or at the very least the future you that arises will have more a pleasant existence than the being that would have arisen had lovingkindness not been a part of its previous existence).

Some of these are plausible. There is scientific research showing that there are health benefits, and mental health benefits, from practicing lovingkindness meditation. Friendly people generally seem to have a more pleasant experience of the world, with less conflict and more fulfilling experience of others. You’ll deny yourself these benefits if you indulge in resentment. Resentment is the saturated fat of emotions, clogging the arteries of our happiness.

11. Break the other person into tiny pieces

Mentally (not physically!) we can dissolve the object of our resentment into various elements, asking ourselves what exactly we’re angry with. Is it the head hairs, the body hairs, the nails, the teeth, etc? Is it the solid matter making up that person, the liquid, the gas, the energy?

This might seem a little silly. In fact it seemed silly to me, right up to the moment that I tried it. There had been resistance to the idea, because I thought, “Well, of course I’m not angry with any of those things, I’m angry with them — with the person as a whole. But setting that resistance aside, and just reflecting on the bits that make up a person takes you away from the thought of them “as a whole” and you temporarily can’t be angry with them!

As Buddhaghosa says, “When he tries the resolution into elements, his anger finds no foothold, like a mustard seed on the point of a needle.”

He’s right.

12. Give a gift

This one’s delightfully straightforward and earthy. If you give the other person a gift — especially something you value — then you break the dynamic of your resentment. You shake things up within yourself. You have to think of the other person as a human being with needs. You have to think about what they might like. You stop your mind from going around and around in the same old rut of complaining. You have to let go of your damned pride. You have to take a risk. You have to make yourself vulnerable.

And giving to the other person changes the dynamic of the relationship. If there’s mutual resentment, then you may shock the other person into seeing you differently.

Buddhaghosa points out that giving naturally leads to kind speech:

Through giving gifts they do unbend
And condescend to kindly speech.

Of course you may be thinking something along the lines of, “Wait! I hate this person; why on earth would I give them something?”

But that just brings up another question. Do you want to end your resentment?

Well, do you?

It’s Okay to Change

It’s Okay to Change

It’s Okay to Change

Originally posted on/by omswami.com July 19, 2013

When you cling to what you believe to be untrue, soft underlying currents of suppression turn into tides of unrest.
When you cling to what you believe to be untrue, soft underlying currents of suppression turn into tides of unrest.

Change is constant — you must have heard it numerous times before. Constancy of change is not just true for the physical world outside but your inner world too. As your thoughts change, so does your viewpoint and with a different perspective, you gain a new understanding. And that automatically brings about a change in your emotional state, in your beliefs; you evolve, you grow, sometimes you grow out. Most people don’t let themselves evolve, they just revolve. They keep going round and round in circles, the same old problems, patterns, same old issues, same old responses, reactions, same old grudges. That’s not because they don’t wish to change but because they deny the internal change.

As we live through more days, as we learn from our experiences, our opinions are bound to change. The society, the world you move in, lets you change only certain opinions but not all. For example, as a child you are made to believe that Santa Claus exists. When you grow up, it is accepted to believe that it was all a setup, that there was never a real Santa. You discover it yourself. You realize that it was someone else’s invention, your parents, elders “created” him for you. Your own discovery gives you the strength and conviction to believe that Santa was a manufacture, an invention. Why is it easy in Santa’s case? Because you stop getting the physical gifts. I don’t think it is because of the lack of chimneys. When physical manifestation, the miraculous appearing of gifts stop, you question naturally. Had the proposition been that Santa comes and gives you peace and joy, it would have been hard, almost impossible, to deny his existence. Why? Because you could neither prove nor disprove it.

And this leads me to the crux of the matter: you are only allowed to change your belief where a tangible and an unambiguous physical proof is available to support your stand. The society does not allow you to question, much less change, your beliefs about your god, your religion, your rituals, at least not freely. A sense of guilt is instilled, you start to think perhaps something is wrong with you, you should not be an atheist or you should not be attracted to other systems of life and inquiry and so on and so forth. You are expected to believe in your Siva, your Jesus, your Allah; you are not allowed to question your belief. There is a subtle, constant and significant pressure on you.

The example of religion is just that, an example. People tend to behave the same in their selection of political parties, leaders, sects, cults etc. The keyword here is behave. Religion is a behavior, a programmed behavior that comes naturally after a while. Most of your actions spring from your behavior. And your natural behavior is simply an automatic response system; it is based on what, how, and how much you have been fed. Is there anything wrong with it? Not necessarily; you decide for yourself.

Getting back to my present subject of change: if you cling to a belief, an opinion you once had but no longer believe it to be true, you are simply putting greater burden on yourself. When you practice what you do not believe, the underlying currents of non-fulfillment turn into the tides of great unrest. When you are not at peace within, you get irritated, angry, hurt, you are affected easily even by petty things, minor issues. These are symptomatic. These happen when you are denying yourself the change that has already matured in you. When you recognize and accept your internal change, you experience a sense of freedom, a feeling of lightness sweeps you away. No reasonable, sane or intelligent person can consistently hold the same belief at all times. A rigid consistency of beliefs show either you are no longer listening to yourself or you are not accepting what your inner voice is telling you. Holding onto a belief is not the same as holding a belief. See the difference. The expectation of consistency is a societal pressure placed on you by the average thinkers in the ordinary world. Such thinkers, by the way, make up ninety-nine percent of our world. If you don’t believe me, just take a look around. Objectively. To paraphrase the thoughts of David Wallace: you will worry less about what people think about you when you realize how little they do.

On a dark winter morning, Mulla Nasrudin’s guest said to him, “You’re so fortunate that you don’t have to go to the mosque in this chilly cold outside.”
“Tell me about it!” said Mulla. “Thank God, I’m an atheist these days.”

Let go of whatever binds you. Be at ease with the change within you. Accept yourself.

Peace.
Swami

(Image credit: Philip Gray)

Everyone Is Beautiful!

Everyone Is Beautiful!

Beauty vs Ugliness by bachatera
Beauty vs Ugliness
by bachatera

I love Paulo Coelho. His words of wisdom often hit me right where it counts. He doesn’t always say what you would expect from a philosopher and he often addresses current issues (Internet Trolls).

Here is another of his wisdoms that I would like to pass on to you all. Short and sweet and to the point.

You are beautiful simply because you exist

Forever and always every single one of you is so very beautiful!

Pay more attention, because here I am

by

We forget that the world is what we imagine it to be.
We stop being the moonlight and become, instead, the pool of water reflecting it.
Tomorrow, the water will evaporate in the sun. And all because, one day, someone said: ‘You are ugly.’ Or: ‘She is pretty.’ With those three simple words, they stole away all our self-confidence.
And we become ugly and embittered.

At that moment, we can draw comfort from so-called ‘wisdom’, an accumulation of ideas put together by people wishing to define the world, instead of respecting the mystery of life.
This ‘wisdom’ consists of all the unnecessary rules, regulations and measurements intended to establish a standard of behaviour.

According to that false wisdom, we should not be concerned about beauty because it is superficial and ephemeral.

That isn’t true. All the beings created under the sun, from birds to mountains, from flowers to rivers, reflect the miracle of creation.

If we resist the temptation to allow other people to define who we are, then we will gradually be able to let the sun inside our own soul shine forth.
Love passes by and says: ‘I never noticed you before.’

And our soul responds:
‘Well, pay more attention, because here I am. It took a breeze to blow the dust from your eyes, but now that you have recognised me, don’t leave me again, because all of us desire beauty.’

taken from THE MANUSCRIPT FOUND IN ACCRA

Click Here for my other feel-good re-posts and quotes from Paul Coelho’s blog.

karma chameleon

karma chameleon

Today’s Daily Prompt is: Reincarnation: do you believe in it?

My Name Is Earl

First off, I would like to say that I think that reincarnation is completely subjective. Hopefully by the end of this post, you will see what I mean. If not, that means that I am just a “prophet ahead of her time” 😉

Have you ever watched the TV show My Name is Earl? I absolutely love it and try to watch the reruns when I can. The funny thing about it is: I didn’t start watching the show until after it was cancelled. I don’t know why I never watched it before… But I love the message it imparts about trying to right your wrongs and come clean with people for the sake of karma (or just plain being a better person), and it’s a fun and uplifting way to start the morning (thank you, TBS).

Loverman doesn’t understand why I like the show so much. That’s also funny because he is a total goofball — and he is forever telling me how silly I am. But he will watch the show with me if it happens to be on, and usually he laughs out loud at least once…

Anyway, I like the concept of this show and I like that it is so simple — just a dude trying to make things right. (and I will eventually get to my point…)

I try to go through my life with that same basic concept, except I don’t live in my home town and I never see (even on Facebook) the people from my “past life”. But I like to “pay it forward” and make sure I “treat people the way I would like to be treated”. However, as we all know, there are times when that’s impossible and other times when I simply don’t want to.

By and by, all of us are really just a sum of our actions (aka – choices) and individualized beliefs and I believe that each of our “final destination”s are tailored by those actions and beliefs. Earl found out that if he started doing nice things for people, nice things happened to him, too (and bad things happened to him less). So he began to make a conscious effort to do good things and then he felt better — therefore, making a choice to change his own “final destination”.

Here are some more examples:

  • Some people think that they will be judged by a higher power and that they may (or may not) get to walk through the pearly gates and “meet their maker” — and that is the end.
  • Others think that once their bodies have died, everything is dead — and that is the end
  • Some think that after they die, their spirits are free to choose a new existence and are reincarnated into a new being — and there is no foreseeable end.

Chameleon_Con_Badge_by_charfadeI believe that each and every one of us is here for a purpose.
I believe that everything is one — and, as a result, I believe that everything happens for a reason.
I believe that, as things happen to us, we are forced to make choices that help us to grow and learn and change (if that is what we choose to do) and in the end, those choices mold our final destiny.
I believe that, ultimately, we will have to answer for those choices. But this is where my opinion differs from most…

I don’t believe in God — at least not like that. I don’t think that I am going to heaven and that I will have to explain to God why I messed up the things I did. I honestly think that there is way too much shit going on “down here” on Earth for God to care about whether or not I brushed my teeth before bed or if I looked both ways before crossing the street. Plus, how can we truly know that God didn’t just get sick of our hedonistic planet (a really long time ago) and go off and create another one, leaving us here to fend for ourselves?

I believe that my beliefs and choices (aka – actions) “build” my karma and that karma decides my destiny because those are the things that I believe.
I believe in reincarnation.
I believe that my level  (or, for lack of a better word, score) of “goodness” or “badness” will determine the type of new being that I become when my body dies and my spirit is reborn.
I also believe that our actions in our past lives effect what happens to us in our current lives.

So, in my reality, it only makes sense that I will be reincarnated but others may not…

  • Door To HellIf you believe that you will be judged by your maker and go to heaven/hell based on your goodness/badness — that will be what happens to you (but I say this belief gives people a false sense of security. Like — asking for forgiveness doesn’t mean a damn thing if you’re planning on doing that same “bad” thing again… My dad drowns hundreds of squirrels in a bucket every summer and he still thinks that he’s getting into heaven. I think he will be a bit upset when God expresses His disappointment in him for all the creatures he killed in cold blood — just so they didn’t eat the bird food in the hanging feeders?!?! Really?)
  • If you believe that once your body has died, everything is dead — that will be what happens to you. (I think this one sounds kind of sad and hopeless, but this is what some people want… And it might be a more “motivational” way of living. I can’t judge because I do not know.)
  • If you believe that after you die, your spirit will be free to choose a new existence — that will be what happens to you. (Yay! That’s me! I want to try again and again and again until I “get it right”!)

In the end, I believe that each one of us will get exactly what we prepare ourselves for… Whether it be heaven, total nothingness or the re-emergence of a new self.