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Word of the Day: Fickle

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I Hate The Word “We”

It’s been a while since I’ve had a rant about work…

 The patronizing “we”

The patronizing we is used sometimes in place of “you” to address a second party, hinting a facetious assurance that the one asked is not alone in his situation, that “I am with you, we are in this together”. A doctor may ask a patient: And how are we feeling today? This usage is emotionally non-neutral and usually bears a condescending, ironic, praising, or some other flavor, depending on intonation: “Aren’t we looking cute?”.

The dictatorial “we”

The dictatorial we is … … … more commonly used in spousal conversations or relating to them. More often used by one person having or showing a tendency to tell people what to do in an autocratic way. Take for example the following portion of a conversation:
  • As soon as we get the rest of the brick work done (in progress) this is part of the plan…
This person is using the dictorial “we” and implying that the other will be doing the work and that they are currently behind and has more waiting afterwards. This form looks nicer and comes across as being less harsh. In spousal dialect this phrase could be loosely swapped out with the following:
  • As soon as {insert spouse name} gets off their lazy butt and finishes the brick work this is the next thing I will have them doing…”
From Wikipedia

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Word of the Day: Gaslighting (revisited)

gaslight1944dvd

Do you know what it is?

Wikipedia says:

Gaslighting or gas-lighting[1] is a form of mental abuse in which false information is presented with the intent of making a victim doubt her or his own memory, perception, and sanity.[2] Instances may range simply from the denial by an abuser that previous abusive incidents ever occurred, up to the staging of bizarre events by the abuser with the intention of disorienting the victim.
The term owes its origin to the play Gas Light and its film adaptations, after which it was coined popularly. Now the term even is used in clinical and research literature.

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